Supplier of: skin actives, cosmetic ingredients, cosmeceuticals, active ingredients, and skin care ingredients, for DIY skin care and cosmetics, and homemade skin care products.
Reviews
Carla, Many medications can be and are applied topically by prescription. With that in mind, realize that this particular ingredient is wonderful but understand that this is indeed one of those that may create sensitivity with those already using topical hormones or just use sparingly and see how you respond. Sorry for the very late response..... ...»
Angela
Im 45 years old; average looking skin for my age. Applied a small pea sized amount of Sea Kelp Bioferment to my face full strength in the am after washing my face of previous night makeup.; let face "dry". Then aplied my foundation as always. Noticed my thick, heavy foundation applied more easily and smooth. Keep in mind this is DAY TWO of me using this. TWO women at work ( separate departments) commented how wonderful my face looked! One specifically came up to me and asked what I was.. ...»
Jessie Sandford
Many thanks for the Silicone DM. This product is lovely quality; it is light, silky, and leaves no residue at all. I use it in the base recipe for a mouldable polymer that I then use to make a simulated 'Amber' for bead making. At the end of this process I have a silky, translucent polymer plus the most gorgeous hands in the studio ! My thanks again, Helen.. ...»
HELEN pEAKE
Very good product! Only been using it for a short time, its already made a difference. .. ...»
Bronwynne
muy satisfecho profesionales, y envio sin problemas ,ya que soy de españa producto bien envasado , un placer ser cliente porque dan comnfianza y calidad.gracias un saludo.. ...»
daniel
Wanting to try this, but.... Angela, what was that about effecting hormones? Could someone explain please..... ...»
Carla
I wished i could order this in a smaller amount of 50 gr. Can i get informed when it is available ? -------------------- A. It will not be sold in smaller amounts. The review rating is meant to be for the product, not the size in which it is sold :-(.. ...»
Diana
I am following the moisturizing cream + Zinc dispersion recipe and I am extremely satisfied. I do allow for a little time for it to absorb in & then I dab off anything that I feel looks a little white - but that's because I initially use a fairly thick coating on myself. I use a bit of foundation at times on top and there are no issues as far as weird colors or texture issues. I am so grateful for this entire website as a one-stop-shop for such effective skin care products, and now we can.. ...»
Peggy
Excellent quality, very fine texture and disperses easily when used correctly. Arrived in just seven days to London, England and with a reasonable postage fee. Very pleased... ...»
D N Bay
The best, most potent and most stable form of Vitamin C. Makes quite a difference to the appearance of mature, photo-damaged skin - don't expect results over night but with consistent use your skin will look more even and radiant!.. ...»
Judy
Secure Payments
Orders Securely Processed Through PayPal
PayPal
 Visa  Mastercard  Discover  American Express
 

SSL Certificate

As Featured On EzineArticles

Google+

 

 

 

Important Stuff

 PLEASE read:

All customers (especially customers from CANADA & the AFRICAN continent), BEFORE ordering please read the FAQ and Delivery Info pages!

Wrong addresses

We take NO responsibility for delivery issues caused by customers entering the wrong address

Delivery

BulkActives is a part-time business. Orders are processed on Saturdays and mailed on Mondays at the latest. (TimeZone Order Deadline Chart)

What we sell

We sell  COSMETIC RAW MATERIALS, which are meant to be used at an appropriate percentage in a cosmetic formulation of your devising. Please do not order our products unless you know how to formulate creams and lotions with it!  

Forgotten your password? Not receiving lost password emails? Can't create an account?

NO PROBLEM!  Just email me, and I will sort it all out.

Not receiving order status email updates?

Please check your JUNK mail folder for our emails, and mark them as NOT SPAM.

Failing to do so will result in NOT receiving ANY transaction / order status email updates.

Recipe % calculator

Download our SIMPLE RECIPE CALCULATOR (MS Excel)

Newsletter
* E-mail Address:
* Name:
Recent Articles

Antioxidants for sun damage protection (photoprotection)

How the skin naturally protects itself and the advantages of topical antioxidants for photoprotection The...

Read article


Ascorbyl Glucoside in Skin Care (AA2G, stable Vitamin C)

Ascorbyl Glucoside or AA2G is a derivative of vitamin C that has been biochemically modified to make...

Read article


Anhydrous C for skin care: L-ascorbic in silicone

Anhydrous C for skin care: absorption of L-ascorbic in a silicone base Anhydrous C is a skin care product...

Read article


Enhancing skin tone and reversing the effects of ageing

Enhancing skin tone and reversing the effects of ageing It is only in recent times that researchers...

Read article


How to boost collagen production in skin

What is Collagen? Collagen is a major structural protein in the skin. It plays a key role in providing...

Read article


Alcohol as Solvent in DIY Skin Care Products

Alcohol is a generic name for organic chemical compounds usually obtained through fermentation. Despite...

Read article


Hyperpigmentation,Melasma, and Skin Color Explained

The enzyme tyrosinase converts the amino acid tyrosine into melanin in the skin. Hyperpigmentation can...

Read article


Improve skin tone and reverse the effects of aging

Latest developments in agents that improve skin tone and reverse the effects of aging Beauty, they say,...

Read article


Made in China - Getting to the Heart of the Matter

After getting a couple of emails about products manufactured in China, I wanted to take the time to write...

Read article


Exfoliating: Mild Chemical Exfoliating in Skin Care

Exfoliating is a cosmetic procedure that involves the removal of dead skin cells that accumulate in the...

Read article


Multi Lamellar Creams and Emulsions

Multi Lamellar Emulsions (MLE) The protective properties of our skin are determined by its complex biological...

Read article


Oat Beta Glucan Skin Care

Oat Beta Glucan Skin Care - Anti Wrinkle Skin Care and Skin Texture Improvements Oat beta glucan has...

Read article


UV Skin Damage - Photodamage and Photoaging

UV skin damage: Photodamage, photoaging and other ways in which the skin changes due to exposure to UV...

Read article


Skin Lightening Process and Pigmentation Formation

Pigmentation formation and skin lightening process Melanin is mainly responsible for skin pigmentation,...

Read article


Resveratrol – nature’s most powerful and potent anti-aging agent yet

The process of aging is one that man has battled with for a long time. A lot of research has been done...

Read article


Rosehip Oil and Vitamin A in Skin Care

Rosehip oil is widely recognized for the effects of the natural topical trans-retinoic acid (vitamin...

Read article


Silymarin Skin Health – Antioxidant & Anti-inflammatory

Silymarin Skin Health – Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, Skin Cancer Preventative In the world of skin...

Read article


Exfoliating Skin with Salicylic Acid

Salicylic acid - a beta hydroxy acid as anti-inflammatory, exfoliating, and anti acne active What is...

Read article


soy isoflavones skin benefits

Soy isoflavones skin benefits in anti aging skin care Research suggests that estrogen deficiencies...

Read article


Sunscreens With Vitamin A are Potentially Harmful for Skin

Sunscreens With Vitamin A are Potentially Harmful for Skin The impact of vitamin A on skin health has...

Read article


Antioxidants for sun damage protection (photoprotection)

How the skin naturally protects itself and the advantages of topical antioxidants for photoprotection The...

Read article

Ascorbyl Glucoside in Skin Care (AA2G, stable Vitamin C)

Ascorbyl Glucoside or AA2G is a derivative of vitamin C that has been biochemically modified to make...

Read article

Anhydrous C for skin care: L-ascorbic in silicone

Anhydrous C for skin care: absorption of L-ascorbic in a silicone base Anhydrous C is a skin care product...

Read article

Enhancing skin tone and reversing the effects of ageing

Enhancing skin tone and reversing the effects of ageing It is only in recent times that researchers...

Read article

How to boost collagen production in skin

What is Collagen? Collagen is a major structural protein in the skin. It plays a key role in providing...

Read article

Alcohol as Solvent in DIY Skin Care Products

Alcohol is a generic name for organic chemical compounds usually obtained through fermentation. Despite...

Read article

Hyperpigmentation,Melasma, and Skin Color Explained

The enzyme tyrosinase converts the amino acid tyrosine into melanin in the skin. Hyperpigmentation can...

Read article

Improve skin tone and reverse the effects of aging

Latest developments in agents that improve skin tone and reverse the effects of aging Beauty, they say,...

Read article

Made in China - Getting to the Heart of the Matter

After getting a couple of emails about products manufactured in China, I wanted to take the time to write...

Read article

Exfoliating: Mild Chemical Exfoliating in Skin Care

Exfoliating is a cosmetic procedure that involves the removal of dead skin cells that accumulate in the...

Read article

Multi Lamellar Creams and Emulsions

Multi Lamellar Emulsions (MLE) The protective properties of our skin are determined by its complex biological...

Read article

Oat Beta Glucan Skin Care

Oat Beta Glucan Skin Care - Anti Wrinkle Skin Care and Skin Texture Improvements Oat beta glucan has...

Read article

UV Skin Damage - Photodamage and Photoaging

UV skin damage: Photodamage, photoaging and other ways in which the skin changes due to exposure to UV...

Read article

Skin Lightening Process and Pigmentation Formation

Pigmentation formation and skin lightening process Melanin is mainly responsible for skin pigmentation,...

Read article

Resveratrol – nature’s most powerful and potent anti-aging agent yet

The process of aging is one that man has battled with for a long time. A lot of research has been done...

Read article

Rosehip Oil and Vitamin A in Skin Care

Rosehip oil is widely recognized for the effects of the natural topical trans-retinoic acid (vitamin...

Read article

Silymarin Skin Health – Antioxidant & Anti-inflammatory

Silymarin Skin Health – Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, Skin Cancer Preventative In the world of skin...

Read article

Exfoliating Skin with Salicylic Acid

Salicylic acid - a beta hydroxy acid as anti-inflammatory, exfoliating, and anti acne active What is...

Read article

soy isoflavones skin benefits

Soy isoflavones skin benefits in anti aging skin care Research suggests that estrogen deficiencies...

Read article

Sunscreens With Vitamin A are Potentially Harmful for Skin

Sunscreens With Vitamin A are Potentially Harmful for Skin The impact of vitamin A on skin health has...

Read article

preservatives

Preservatives in skin care

Preservatives are chemicals that kill bacteria, fungi and molds. They are commonly present in ANY product that contains water. For this reason, oil-based skin care products and anhydrous (water free) skin care products, do not need preservatives. However, creams, lotions and any other product where water is present, require adding a preservative.

 If you do NOT use a preservative, or if you decide to believe the hype and try out a "natural" preservative (such as grapefruit seed extracts), then you are putting yourself, and your skin, at RISK. The only way you can avoid using preservatives is if you make your products FRESH every 3 days, and store them in the refrigerator.

We have now started carrying two preservative systems.  None are formaldehyde releasing, but they do contain other chemicals that have been getting an (unjustified) bad name (phenoxyethanol and the paraben family).

Parabens and Phenoxyethanol Safety

Parabens have a bad reputation, mainly due to a 2004 study, which basically claimed that parabens in underarm deoderants casued cancer. However, researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a part of the National Institutes of Health, are not aware of any conclusive evidence linking the use of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer, The EU Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, and The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA),do not have any evidence or research data that ingredients (including parabens) in underarm antiperspirants or deodorants cause cancer. Phenoxyethanol is safe and effective at the designated levels in personal care products and cosmetics. It has a long history of effective preservation of these products, and its safety has been extensively documented on human health. Based on available data, the CIR Expert Panel has concluded that ethylhexylglycerin,is safe for use in cosmetical products. The alkyl glyceryl ethers, including ethylhexylglycerin, may be used in cosmetics and personal care products marketed in Europe according to the general provisions of the Cosmetics Regulation of the European Union.

Shelf life of products WITH preservatives:

  • with preservative = one month
  • without preservative = 3 days and must be stored in a fridge.
The reason why we suggest 1 month for products with a preservatives is because:
  • ALL preservative manufacturers recommend that proper stress tests and plate counts are done under various temperatures and storage conditions, in order to calculate the correct amount of preservative used in a product in relation to the ingredients used.
  • This can take as long as 2 years.
  • Note that if you are planning on selling your products (on ebay etc.) then it is essential (to legally protect YOU) that this process is followed, preferably by a qualified person in a registered lab. However, for DIY use, making a product (with preservative) fresh every month is perfectly safe.

The Efficacy and Safety of Natural Preservatives are Questionable 

 The use of preservatives is essential in most products to prevent product damage caused by microorganisms and to protect the product from inadvertent contamination by the consumer during use. An ingredient that protects the product from the growth of microorganisms is called an antimicrobial. A preservative may also be added to a product to protect it against damage and degradation caused by exposure to oxygen, and in this instance, these ingredients are also called antioxidants. Without preservatives, cosmetic products, just like food, can become contaminated, leading to product spoilage and possibly irritation or infections. Microbial contamination of products, especially those used around the eyes and on the skin, can cause significant problems. Preservatives help prevent such problems. [1] Whenever a product contains water or might be exposed to water, a preservative has to be added. [2]
 
The Efficacy and Safety of Natural Preservatives are QuestionableAccording to the United States Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Cosmetic Handbook, "The hazard of inadequately preserved cosmetics to human health has been amply demonstrated". [3] Most cosmetic products contain enough water and nutrients for microorganisms to grow in them quite well. Some of the potential contaminants do no more than make the product unappealing for a consumer to use; they make it smell bad or appear as fuzzy colonies on the surface. Others, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogen, Candida albicans, etc may be pathogenic, requiring medical attention [Table 1.]. Incidences have been reported of blindness caused by contaminated mascara. Skin infections can result from contaminated body lotions, particularly if they are applied to dry, cracked, or otherwise compromised skin. [4-5]


Cosmetics are often stored in the bathroom, where the environment is warm and moist; microorganisms thrive in this environment. Human skin carries a bioburden, and tap water is not sterile. Both of these elements are routinely introduced into cosmetics. Consumers add water to shampoo so as to squeeze the last bit out of the bottle, then place the remnants back on the shelf to use the next time. Young girls routinely share makeup products. Skin care products often come in large, wide-mouth containers that the entire family can use. Even the most meticulously prepared product can become contaminated under these circumstances. Cosmetic manufacturers must take all of this information into consideration when choosing a preservative system for their products. [4]
 
The use of a conventional chemical preservative along with some innate capacity of the formulation to resist spoilage [due to the high level of solvents and low water content], was previously sufficient to protect the product during manufacturing and throughout its lifetime of use by the consumer. However, modern product formulations with eco-compliant ingredients are under increased pressure by ecolabeling organizations to abandon the use of conventional chemical preservatives in favor of alternative substances that are seen by various groups to be more “natural”. [6-7] Concurrently, consumers and environmental groups are demanding that products be more “environmentally-preferable” in addition to maintaining the same standard of effectiveness at the lowest possible price. With relevant changes such as reduced volatile organic content [VOC], elimination of heavy metals and replacement of solvents with water, products may be perceived as more “green”, but the very real consequence of increased microbial susceptibility must be acknowledged. The removal of ingredients, which once created an inhospitable environment for bacteria and fungi, has a significant impact on product quality. Ineffective preservation of these products and the raw materials used to produce them can have detrimental results including significant changes in viscosity, pH drift, color change and foul odor, all of which can occur while destroying the performance of the product. [8]
 
Preservatives are often referred to as biocides, and biocides are by definition toxic and usually lethal to bacteria and fungi. A successful preservative must be broadly effective against a variety of bacterial and fungal [including molds and yeasts] species, or alternatively a combination of an effective bactericide and an effective fungicide may be used. A natural non-toxic alternative, that is still effective in controlling a broad spectrum of microorganisms, may at best be deemed an unrealistic expectation. [9] Beyond preserving consumer and industrial products, biocides must be compatible with other ingredients in the formulations. Fortunately, conventional preservatives are usually added at less than 0.1% active ingredient, and compatibility issues are infrequent. In contrast, non-traditional [natural alternative] preservatives are typically used at concentrations greater than 1% to achieve antimicrobial efficacy and they may significantly alter other properties of formulations. To achieve potentially the same level of efficacy, organic acids and essential oils are generally required at concentrations of 20 to 50 times and 20 to 200 times greater than the conventional preservatives, respectively. [10] To obtain a registration for a preservative,  the  preservative  supplier  must  generate  an  extensive  data  package  including toxicology, environmental fate, exposure, product chemistry, and efficacy studies, which is not always the case with natural preservatives. [11] All natural products cannot be considered de facto “safe” because some of these materials have been shown to elicit allergic reactions, and infections in humans which may be amplified at the high use levels of 1 to 10% required for sufficient antimicrobial performance. [12]
 
The type of preservative formulators use for “natural” cosmetics include some of the following: alcohol, benzoic acid, boraxitrus seed extracts, citric acid, copper salts, essential oils, phenoxyethanol, fragrance oils, glycerin, hinokitiol, honey, japanese honeysuckle extracts, lactic acid, melaleucol [tea tree] oil, perillic acid, potassium sorbate, salicylic acid, vitamin E, salt, silver chloride, sodium gluconate, sodium benzoate, sorbic acid, sugar, usnic acid, wasabi extract, zinc salts. For professional formulas the most common are sodium benzoate, phenoxyethanol, or sorbic acid. However, these don’t work for every application. [13]
 
It’s a common myth that anti-oxidants like vitamin A, C, E citric acid, Grapefruit Seed Extract and rosemary extract, essential oils, potassium sorbate and sugar are preservatives BUT THEY ARE NOT! [14-17] Vitamin E is an anti-oxidant that can help retard rancidity, but it is not a preservative that will prevent microbial growth. Citric acid can be used as an anti-oxidant that can help retard rancidity, but it will also mess with the pH of the product, making it more acidic by 1 pH at 0.2% or so. [2] Grapefruit seed extract [GSE] is derived from the seed and pulp of grapefruits, and it may contain many lovely things - anti-oxidants, flavonoids, Vitamin C, citric acid, phytosterols, and tocopherols, but it is not a preservative. It may behave as an anti-oxidant in some products, but it will not keep the microbes and fungi out of lotions and other formulations. Study after study has shown that the preserving power of GSE comes from the preservatives added to the product. Various studies have shown GSE contains benzethonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, triclosan, and various parabens, and these are what offer the bacteria, fungus, yeast, and mold fighting powers attributed to GSE. Thus, it is concluded that the potent as well as nearly universal antimicrobial activity being attributed to grapefruit seed extract is merely due to the synthetic preservative agents contained within. Natural products with antimicrobial activity do not appear to be present. [15,17]

Essential oils are not preservatives also. They might have some anti-microbial features [like eugenol], but none of them have been proven to be effective preservatives in cosmetic products. [2] According to Preservatives for Cosmetics by David C. Steinberg, essential oils that have demonstrated antimicrobial activity include caraway, cinnamon, clove, cumin, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, rose, sage, sandalwood and thyme. Unfortunately, the percentage required to adequately protect a product from microbial growth generally exceeds the recommendations for safe amounts of essential oils to use in skin care products. Rosemary Oil Extract is an antioxidant, meaning that it will remove free radicals from a blend whether it is a lotion, soap, or oil. ROE is wonderful for adding life to oils and preventing them from going rancid, but it is not a preservative in the sense of bacterial inhibition. Bacteria can still grow in products if ROE and water are both present. [2,16]

Sugar cannot be used as a stand-alone preservative in bath and body products. It is true that sugar can be used as a preservative such as with jams and jellies, but it is important to remember that the potency behind its preservative nature in these applications is that in jams and jellies, they are preserved in a vacuum; with no exposure to air. [16] Potassium sorbate can effectively preserve against mold and yeast, but it is not useful for protecting from bacteria. It is not at all effective in products with a pH over 6, which most lotions are. While potassium sorbate is found in nature, any available today would have been synthetically made so it is not all-natural. It can also cause contact dermatitis. Vitamins A, C can extend the shelf life of products by preventing oxidation and by slowing the growth of certain bacteria, and, they are good for health. But, these vitamins are not effective as broad-spectrum preservatives and cannot replace other preservatives in all products. For example: orange juice is loaded with Vitamin C. But, would anyone want to drink a glass that was left in the bathroom for a couple of months? [17]
 
There are a number of types of microbes that can grow in cosmetics and some of them are dangerous. There is the Staphylococcus epidermidis, bacteria that can be found living on color cosmetics like lipsticks, eyeshadows and eyeliners. This bacteria naturally lives on the skin but some strains can cause infection. This is why no one should share color cosmetics with others. Another bacterial group in cosmetics is Staphylococcus Warneri, which is normally found on the skin. If one is sick and has a compromised immune system this bacteria can cause problems. In extreme cases, this bacteria has been associated with heart valve damage. It’s something that should be avoided. Then there are bacterias that can cause pneumonia, lower respiratory infections, urinary tract infections and more. There are also yeasts that can cause thrush, and a variety of molds that can cause allergic reactions, cornea infections, and lung damage. The length of time that someone has to be exposed to a microbe to develop a sickness depends on too many factors to give a simple answer. It could be just a couple of microbes one time and someone gets sick. Or someone could be one of those people who are particularly tolerant of microbes and never gets sick no matter how much exposure he or she has. Since no one can know it’s best to avoid exposure whenever possible. [13]
 
Here is just a sampling of what preservatives can protect from. These microbes have been found growing in cosmetics ranging from lotions, shampoo/conditioners to lipsticks etc. [18]

Bacteria - Gram Negative Non-Fermentors:

  • Acinetobacter sp. – Can cause life-threatening infections in compromised individuals.
  • Alcaligenes sp. – Opportunistic infections
  • Pseudomonas sp. [putida, fluorescens, pausimobilis, aeruginosa, etc] – Second most common infection in hospitals 

 Bacteria - Gram Negative Fermentors:

  • Citrobacter freundii – Can cause life-threatening infections in compromised individuals.
  • Enterobacter sp. [ agglomerans, aerogenes, gergoviae] – infections include bacteremia, lower respiratory tract infections, skin infections, soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections, UTI, endocarditis, intraabdominal infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and ophthalmic infections.
  • Klebsiella sp. [oxytoca, pneumonia] – Causes pneumonia.
  • Proteus sp. – Causes mastoiditis.
  • Serratia sp. [marcescens, odorifera rubidaea] – opportunistic pathogen 

 Bacteria - Gram Positive:

  •  Bacillus sp.
  • Staphylococcus aureus – Staph. infections
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis – Staph infections
  • Enterococcus sp. – Urinary tract infections
  • Streptococcus sp. – Strep throat.  Meningitis
  • Propionibacterium sp. – Acne Yeasts:- Candida sp. – Can cause thrush.  Systemic infection kills 40 – 50% of people infected.
  • Saccharomyces sp. – Food spoilage
  • Torula sp., Zygosaccharomyces sp. Molds:
  • Absidia sp. – Causes Mucormycosis
  • Alternaria sp. – Human allergen
  • Aspergillus sp. - Produces aflatoxin which is both a toxin and a carcinogen
  • Cladosporium sp. – reported to cause infections of the skin and toenails
  • Fusarium sp. – Infections may occur in the nails or the cornea
  • Helminthosporium sp.- Asthma and respiratory infections
  • Hormodendrum sp. – Allergies
  • Geotrichum sp. – Causative agent of geotrichosis
  • Phoma sp. – Can cause cutaneous or subcutaneous infections
  • Aureobasidium sp. – Can damage lungs
  • Rhizopus sp. – Can cause a fatal fungal infection zygomycosis 
  There have been serious problems from spoiled and contaminated cosmetics which had contained natural preservatives. In a Barcelona hospital, five intensive care patients became infected with a deadly bacteria called Burkholderia cepacia. Officials traced the illness to a moisturizing body milk used in the patients care. The outbreak occurred at the Universitari del

Mar Hospital in Barcelona, where it was common practice to apply moisturizer after washing intensive care patients. “Those infections were due to inadequately preserved cosmetics” observed David Steinberg, Steinberg & Associates, Inc. [14,19]. In 1947, in New Zealand, unsterilised talc caused 25 cases of Tetanus, and 4 fatalities [14]
 
While it would be great if a “natural” alternative for preservation existed, the truth is there isn’t one that is effective enough. To keep certain types of products free of bacteria, mold and yeast and to make it a product that is safe for your use, a chemical preservative is necessary

Let me repeat, if you make your products FRESH every 3 DAYS, and store them in the refrigerator, then, and ONLY then, can you avoid using preservatives.

BUT PLEASE for your own safety, consider using a safe, paraben based preservative system in ALL your DIY skin care formulations.


The potential harm to your skin caused by bacteria, mold and fungus is enormous, whereas the negative claims about parabens in skin care are debunked.

 

References

[1] Cosmetics Info: Preservative Information. Retrieved [May 22, 2015] from http://cosmeticsinfo.org/ingredient/ethylhexylglycerin
[2] When should you use a preservative? Sunday, January 29, 2012. Retrieved [May 22, 2015] from http://swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/when-should-you-use-preservative.html
[3] FDA/CFSAN -- Cosmetics Handbook for Industry US Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. FDA/IAS Booklet. Wahington, DC: 1992.
[4] Linda B. Sedlewicz, BS, Cosmetic Preservatives: Friend or Foe?, Skinmed. 2005;4[2]:98-100. Retrieved [May 23, 2015] from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/502370
[5] Elsner P, Merk HE, Maibach, eds. Cosmetic Controlled Efficacy Studies and Regulations.Stuttgart, Germany: Springer Verlag; 199:275-290
[6] . United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Design for the Environment [DfE], www.epa.gov/dfe.
[7] Natural Products Association.  Natural Home Care Standard 020910v01.doc www.NPAinfo.org.
[8] American Chemistry Council Biocides Panel. 2010. Benefits of Antimicrobial Pesticides in Public-Health and Industrial Uses.
[9] Beth Ann Browne, Phil Geis, Tony Rook, CSPA Preservative Defense Task Force: Conventional vs. Natural Preservatives
[10] Browne, B.A. 2010. “The Influence of Global Regulatory Requirements and Pressures on Preservative Choices for Consumer Products.”  May 6, 2010. Consumer Specialty Products Association Mid-year Meeting.  Chicago, IL.
[11] US EPA Reregistration Eligibility Decision [RED] Flower and Vegetable Oils. EPA 738-R- 93-031. Dec 1993.
[12] Bleasel, N., Tate, B., and Rademaker, M. 2002.  Allergic contact dermatitis following exposure to essential oils. Australasian Journal of Dermatology 43[3]: 211-213
[13] Perry Romanowski, Natural Cosmetic Preservative Questions Answered, 12/02/2014, Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://chemistscorner.com/natural-cosmetic-preservative- questions-answered/
[14] Reviews of 27 Preservatives, Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://www.makingskincare.com/preservatives/
[15] Preservatives: Grapefruit seed extract [GSE] is NOT a preservative. Saturday, October 16, 2010. Retrieved [May 23, 2015] from http://swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.com/2010/10/preservatives-grapefruit-seed-extract.html
[16] Coily by Nature: The Truth About Natural Preservatives, Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://www.coilybynature.com/preservatives-the-truth-about-natural-preservatives/
[17] Treasured Locks: The Truth About Preservatives Including Grapefruit Seed Extract and Parabens, Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://www.treasuredlocks.com/trabpringrse.html
[18] Perry Romanowski, Why are there preservatives in cosmetics, 02/09/2012. Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://chemistscorner.com/why-are-there-preservatives-in-cosmetics/
[19] Tom Branna, Preservative Market Update: A high profile health issue puts preservatives in a good light, but regulators, consumers and many marketers continue to search for alternatives to traditional systems. Published April 30, 2008. Retrieved [May 24, 2015] from http://www.happi.com/contents/view_features/2008-04-30/preservative-market-update-85454/

Quick guide to our preservatives:

For facial washes, body washes, and shampoos: EK300
For acidic creams/lotions (Vitamin C): EK300 or EPE9010
For alkaline creams/lotions (MAP): EPE9010

 
Display: List / Grid
Show:
Sort By:
EK300 (Phenoxyethanol + Methyl,Butyl,Ethyl,Propyl & Isobutyl paraben)

EK300 is a non-formaldehyde releasing, paraben and phenoxyethanol based, liquid preservative for cosmetic products.  It has a broad, balanced spectrum of effect against bacteria, yeasts, and mould fungi. It acts even in low concentrations and can be used at low (acidic) pH. On account of its limited solubility in water, in purely aqueous systems it can only be dissolved in
low concentrations. Particularly in formulations with a low water content, heating to 60–70 °C may be sufficient for incorporation of a sufficient amount into the aqueous phase. In formulations that contain surfactants, it can be dissolved in the surfactants before the addition of water and other components. Also sold as:Phenonip, Euxyl K 300.

Parabens have a bad reputation, mainly due to a 2004 study, which basically claimed that parabens in underarm deoderants casued cancer. However, researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a part of the National Institutes of Health, are not aware of any conclusive evidence linking the use of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer, The EU Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, and The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA),do not have any evidence or research data that ingredients (including parabens) in underarm antiperspirants or deodorants cause cancer.

Phenoxyethanol, Methylparaben, Butylparaben, Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Isobutylparaben in skin care:

  • Paraben and phenoxyethanol based liquid preservative
  • non-formaldehyde releasing
  • globally approved
  • stable in low (acidic) pH
  • effective in pH-ranges up to 8
  • broad, balanced spectrum of effect against bacteria, yeasts and mould fungi
  • effective even in low use-concentrations
  • proved to have good chemical compatibility with anionic surfactants such as sulphates, ether sulphates and sulphonates, as well as with non-ionogenic surfactants.
  • non-ionic surfactants and ether sulphates lead to losses of effectiveness.

Quick guide to our preservatives:

  • For facial washes, body washes, and shampoos: EK300
  • For acidic creams/lotions (L ascorbic): EK300 or EPE9010
  • For alkaline creams/lotions (SAP): EPE9010
$7.40
EPE9010 (Ethylhexylglycerin + Phenoxyethanol)

EPE9010 is a liquid cosmetic preservative based on phenoxyethanol and ethylhexylglycerin. The addition of ethylhexylglycerin affects the interfacial tension at the cell membrane of microorganisms, improving the preservative activity of phenoxyethanol. It has a broad, balanced spectrum of effect against bacteria, yeasts and mould fungi. Ethylhexylglycerin and  Phenoxyethanol is stable to hydrolysis, temperature and pH. As a result of the good solubility of Ethylhexylglycerin and Phenoxyethanol, an easy dispersion in the various systems even at low temperature is possible. Ethylhexylglycerin (and) Phenoxyethanol is effective in pH-ranges up to 12 (acidic to alkaline). Gels preserved with Ethylhexylglycerin and Phenoxyethanol stay clear and transparent.

Phenoxyethanol is safe and effective at the designated levels in personal care products and cosmetics. It has a long history of effective preservation of these products, and its safety has been extensively documented on human health. Based on available data, the CIR Expert Panel has concluded that ethylhexylglycerin,is safe for use in cosmetical products. The alkyl glyceryl ethers, including ethylhexylglycerin, may be used in cosmetics and personal care products marketed in Europe according to the general provisions of the Cosmetics Regulation of the European Union.

Ethylhexylglycerin (and) Phenoxyethanol in skin care:

  • Innovative cosmetic preservative based on phenoxyethanol
  • Paraben free, non-formaldehyde releasing,
  • globally approved
  • stable to hydrolysis, temperature and pH
  • Effective in pH-ranges up to 12
  • broad, balanced spectrum of effect against bacteria,yeasts and mould fungi
  • effective even in low use-concentrations
  • ethylhexylglycerin improves the preservative activity of phenoxyethanol
  • Gels preserved with EPE9010 stay clear and transparent.
  • Oil soluble and soluble in glycerin
  • A high load of surfactants can lead to loss in effectiveness

Quick guide to our preservatives:

  • For facial washes, body washes, and shampoos: EK300
  • For acidic creams/lotions (L ascorbic): EK300 or EPE9010
  • For alkaline creams/lotions (SAP): EPE9010
$8.70
(c) BulkActives 2005-2015